Speed Control & stroke Drills

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Speed Control & stroke Drills

Postby Practice8 on Thu Jan 24, 2008 11:14 pm

What are the best drills to use to practice speed control & a consistant stroke.
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Postby badandy on Fri Jan 25, 2008 2:22 pm

consistent stroke is the bane of most if not all pool players. it takes practice and paying attention to what you are doing. there are little drills like stroking parallel to the cushion / rail joint and watch your cue as it glides back and forth along the joint to see if it is wiggling or going straight. similar method is to stroke at the cb on the spot with the cue directly over the diamond on the rail and look down to see if your cue is going consistent over the spot or drifting around. there are the shots of shooting the cb down to the opposite diamond and not moving to see if the cb returns and hits the tip of you cue. i find all of those interesting but of not real LASTING value. it does not take long in a game after 'correcting' your stroke with one of the above methods then go back to a bad stroke habit. for the duration, i find it just takes a lot of practice and paying attention to the stroke. the hard part is often we can not feel the problem but we know we have a problem, just cant see it. the more practice we have the more we are able to feel the problem.

as far as speed control, this may help, it is short and simple but again it takes practice.

http://www.easypooltutor.com/article176.html
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Postby molongnezz on Sat Jan 26, 2008 12:24 am

i can suggest that you should play without any object ball, just a cue ball and your cue. using your chalk(tisa) mark the pool table in any palces then then make a shot using the rail and make sure that your cue ball will land to the marked chalk.
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Postby shark on Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:25 am

Stroke drill are quite different from speed drill.. But it does compliment each other.
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Postby erikido on Sun Mar 30, 2008 5:41 am

badandy wrote:consistent stroke is the bane of most if not all pool players. it takes practice and paying attention to what you are doing. there are little drills like stroking parallel to the cushion / rail joint and watch your cue as it glides back and forth along the joint to see if it is wiggling or going straight. similar method is to stroke at the cb on the spot with the cue directly over the diamond on the rail and look down to see if your cue is going consistent over the spot or drifting around. there are the shots of shooting the cb down to the opposite diamond and not moving to see if the cb returns and hits the tip of you cue. i find all of those interesting but of not real LASTING value. it does not take long in a game after 'correcting' your stroke with one of the above methods then go back to a bad stroke habit. for the duration, i find it just takes a lot of practice and paying attention to the stroke. the hard part is often we can not feel the problem but we know we have a problem, just cant see it. the more practice we have the more we are able to feel the problem.

as far as speed control, this may help, it is short and simple but again it takes practice.

http://www.easypooltutor.com/article176.html



I completely agree. However, I think in a lot of cases stroke issues can really be stance/setup issues as well which are showing themselves as stroke issues because you are not confident because you "don't feel right" in your stance. Yesterday I made a very slight adjustment in my approach to the ball(getting down into my stance that is) and almost immediately I found myself in stroke.
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Postby jongreve on Mon Mar 31, 2008 2:31 pm

buy the pro book, make it your bible.

The one I like best for stroke is the corner-to-corner straight in STOP (+/- 1/2 ball) shot.

When my stroke begins to stray, I shoot about 15 of these into one corner switch to other corner for another 15.

I repeat this pattern until my sucess rate (%) is acceptable. Depending on my current weekly hours of play, I'm happy around 90% to the right hand pocket, and 85% to the left hand pocket.

makes for a long day if I start out 9/15.


<opinion follows>
As far as speed control goes, the speed is different for every type of shot that you normally play. One simple drill to learn speed control is a pipe dream.

--Jon
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Postby JJFSTAR on Wed Apr 02, 2008 6:03 pm

Ah yes yet another pool player has realized what it all comes down to. Practice speed control with a good stroke. Welcome to the most frustrating part of the pool players development. Those who have written pool books could give you answers that would take days to read. Byrns’ practice game in his Standard book of Pool and Billiards is an excellent speed control game and I suggest adding your own shots to the game to make it longer. The drill called “universal” suggested in the above link is good but is a little boring to do by yourself; it is better to play it against someone to a # of points IMHO. In the article it says to use what is commonly known as “point positioning” in other words it is very important to decide EXACTLY where the CB will come to rest on every shot or else the shot teaches you little or nothing, once you get into this habit you are “practicing speed” on every pool shot you take in any game ever. On a personal note it helps me to size up about what kind of shot I am taking. I ask myself (this takes milliseconds once you start doing this) Is this close to a half ball, two thirds ball, one 32nd of a ball or whatever hit? So I have some basis on what kind of power or lack thereof to get the CB to a specific spot. This helps with the problem that jongreve speaks of by giving yourself a base point of reference.

On to a good stroke. More bologna has been written and said about this subject than probably any other subject in the game. The stroke is to a pool player what an engine is to a vehicle. In the book I am writing the stroke is an entire chapter and I am certainly not going to post that here. Strokes are like fingerprints they are all just a little bit different or a lot different. I suggest filming yourself from all angles and distances and doing some self coaching as I have suggested to others on this board. Be critical of yourself but work with the way YOU do it best. So many will tell you you need to do this that or the other thing and it is simply not true. The CB doesn’t care what you are doing back there and the only thing it reacts to is where and how hard you hit it and that’s all. How you go about doing that is as individual as an eye’s retina; oh sure there are rules of thumb that work for 99.999% of the humans on earth and that’s why I suggest filming and critiquing yourself. Make sure your wrist, elbow, shoulder and dominant eye are all “lined up” and that you are not jerking back, standing up, letting go of the cue etc.. Also tape and review in slow motion E. Reyes or F. Bustamante’s stroke vs. K. or A. Fisher’s strokes, it’s like comparing cannons to snipers but both types work very well and you will note minute differences within those “types” as well.
As for as working on you stroke with a drill I suggest my frozen CB drill and my draw drill. The frozen CB drill is done by freezing a CB to the rail and shooting shots at different angles and moving the OB farther and farther away. The draw drill is done by Placing the CB anywhere on the head string and the OB anywhere on the foot string and trying to draw back the length of the table and pocket the CB in one of the corner pockets behind you. You can spend hours doing this and it does help you with what you already have.
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